Food remedies soothe aches

Columbia Daily Tribune, food, food writing, news, Will Write for Food

FLORENCE, Italy — The room smelled like spoiled milk. Vats bubbled with liquid whey as cheese curdled. Marco Cavani demonstrated the art of making Parmigiano-Reggiano, casually dipping his fingers in the boiling mixture to make sure everything was perfect.

Source: Food remedies soothe aches

From garden to table

agriculture, food, food writing, MU Journalism Abroad, where I've been, Will Write for Food

Plated

By Claire Lardizabal
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CHIUSDINO, Italy – Mint perfumes the air as you walk through one of Tenuta di Spannocchia’s three gardens. The hard-boiled eggs at breakfast came from the hens, the salad lettuce for lunch was just picked this morning and the rosé wine served at dinner was vinted and bottled here just last year.

As you pass the four lemon trees and step into the garden below, the endless slope of vegetables and herbs can become overwhelming. What don’t they have? I thought to myself as we gingerly tried not to crush rows of potatoes, carrots and basil.

Carmen Zandarin is the mastermind behind all this and has been for the past 12 years. She runs and maintains the gardens with the help of eight farm interns a year. On Mondays, she walks through the gardens then discusses the following week’s meals with the kitchen staff, depending on what’s…

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Do the lampredotto

food writing, MU Journalism Abroad, what I'm eating, Will Write for Food

Plated

By Claire Lardizabal
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FLORENCE, Italy—I took a deep breath and looked at the hot sandwich in my hands. Between a golden brown panino bun, smothered in parsley sauce, were the cooked innards of a cow stomach. I was about to take a bite of Tuscan street food, lampredotto.

Beatrice Trambusti asked me if I wanted it spicy. Beatrice, along with her mother and brother, opened the Lupen E Margo food stall 30 years ago near Mercato Centrale. I said yes, but only a little, as she added a teaspoon of green chili sauce. Beatrice handed me my lampredotto in a convenient plastic wrap with extra napkins.

Eating lampredotto standing up requires a certain grace. The local Tuscans stared at me as I tried to take a bite, then another, as chunky pieces fell to the ground for the pigeons to devour. I had to sit down to enjoy it.

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Granitas beat the heat

food writing, MU Journalism Abroad, what I'm eating, Will Write for Food

Plated

By Claire Lardizabal
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FLORENCE, Italy— At the Mercato Centrale, stalls of purses, scarves and various trinkets surround the massive complex while inside local meat and produce vendors thrive. Upstairs, tourists and locals alike can also find the Arà: è Sicilia granita stand for a refreshing, sweet treat. The Sicilian granita is Italy’s own rendition of the slushy, made of sugar, ice and many flavors, but it holds its weight like a sorbet. Granitas can be found all over Italy, but are more popular in southern regions such as Campania because of warmer climates.

The festive Arà stall can be found by the market’s interior stairway. The flavored shaved ice is made every morning and is stored in deep silver cylinders.

Granitas can be served with a brioche or cream for an extra charge. Generous samples of coffee, lemon, almond, strawberry or cherry granita are given on neon plastic spoons. I…

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A (fruit) fly in the oinment of Pruneti organic olive oil

agriculture, MU Journalism Abroad, news, Will Write for Food

Plated

By Claire Lardizabal

SAN POLO in CHIANTI, Italy—The olive fruit fly, Mosca Olearia, devastated half of the Pruneti’s olive grove and led a decrease in overall olive oil production due to unfavorable weather in 2014.

The Azienda Agricola Pruneti is located in the rolling hills of Chianti outside of Florence. The Pruneti family has been producing olive oil since the 19th century, and currently maintains 28,000 olive trees on 150 acres of land.

The grandfathers of the clan used a hot-press method that was easier but quality had to be sacrificed for quantity. Now, it is the other way around. Olive oil is cold-pressed at 27°C through stainless steel machinery. The cold temperature yields better quality because it will preserve the olive’s vitamins.

Last year’s heavy rains and humidity created a breeding ground for the fruit fly that then ate olive crops and contaminated olive crates, cutting the estimated…

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