A Fresh Take on “This is America”

one thing I cannot believe people have NOT talked about yet is the impact of music videos on our youth, especially young black children. we’ve been warned in the past about how too much MTV is bad for you, but what exactly are music videos doing to children? in Childish Gambino’s “This is America” music video, we watch a stream of recurring problems for African Americans (which we are sadly desensitized to at this point), but I feel like the biggest one has flown right above everybody’s head.

there’s a reason he chose black school children in uniforms as his dancers. if they were in any other dress, we would forget that these kids are only in school. imagine being a young black child after school, scrolling through the channels. all he or she sees is a sea of white: white actors, white problems, white music. then they stop at BET or MTV or ESPN and sees someone who looks like them. they see talent, fame, and a ticket to respect. (something children clearly do not have enough of, but more on that later.)

they see these moves. they imitate them, in hopes to be as good as what they see on their TV screen. then there’s the words, the enticing rhythm and flow. violence is a common theme they rap along to. so is sex, alcohol, and drugs. when they repeat this cycle enough, it becomes the norm. then they bring it to school. they start living it out on the weekends. and when life gets to be too much, there’s the unlucky ones who take it to the streets and probably end up belonging to the streets till they hit the grave. the streets are where those music video dreams can come alive.

in “This is America,” among all the chaos and crime, the children dance as a way of expression, but ultimately represent the influence black musicians can have. Donald Glover shows how he can smile and dance and rap without taking a second look at the chaos behind him, and the teens blindly follow in suit. he’s blatantly calling out the rappers who are not using their privilege to speak the truth and break the cycle. the same can also be said for the media, which has a track record of depicting African Americans as criminals.

going forward, we should empower youth, especially black youth, to show them a way out of this false narrative. I feel like there’s a lot of unnecessary hate in this country and to fix it, we need to take a step back, think about that feeling, and learn as much about it as we can to offer a solution. rap artists should take note that they have a very difficult/important role to play, too, but rap & hip hop may very well be the bridge that brings us all together.

Camp Unplugged: Shambhala Sun Camp cultivates mindfulness and individuality for young campers

Dhyana Kida was 12 years old when she first attended the Shambhala Sun Camp nestled in the picturesque mountains of Red Feather Lakes, Colorado. Her parents had gone when they were her age, her brother has also attended, and then it was finally her turn.

“I fell in love and went almost every year,” Kida, now 21, says. Her story is similar to most who go: they find themselves returning to camp year after year, eventually becoming staff members that guide the next batch of camp-goers.

via Camp unplugged – Boulder Weekly

Get Schooled on Champagne at Nocturne Jazz & Supper Club

If you haven’t been to RiNo’s Nocturne Jazz & Supper Club5280’s 2017 Top of the Town pick for Eatertainment—here’s an excellent reason for you to check it out: Champagne School. Nocturne co-owner and sommelier Scott Mattson and Breakthru Beverage sommeliers Sam Heider and Adam Vance debuted the class series in July, covering topics such as rosé and grower’s Champagne. Sadly, all of the summer classes are sold out—but there’s still time to make it to the last installment. The final(e) class, which will focus on Champagne winemaking traditions and the art of food pairings, takes place on October 29. This don’t-miss event features a four-course meal by chef Greg Weadick, ample bubbly tastings and pairings, and a set of tunes from vintage-jazz musicians Annie Booth and Matt Smiley.

via Go to Champagne School at Nocture Jazz & Supper Club

Get Your Summer Passport Now!

Everybody loves a good bargain. And the Passport Program—which offers two-for-one boozy drink deals at 68 different venues across town—may be our very favorite way to pinch pennies. Two Parts initially launched the Passport Program in Denver in 2013, and it’s since expanded to eight more U.S. cities, as well as developing a winter program (the Winter Warmer) and a coffee-centric version (the Fika Passport).

via Get Your Summer Passport Now! – 5280

Smart Sips: The Infinite Monkey Theorem’s Dry-Hopped SB

Once upon a time, oenophiles might have have turned up their noses at the prospect of canned wine. Indeed, when RiNo-based urban winery the Infinite Monkey Theoremreleased its first line of canned vino in 2011, it had to convince consumers that its red, white, rose, and moscato were all just as good as their glass-bottled counterparts. Fast forward to 2017, and TIMT is still innovating: Winemaker and founder Ben Parsons defied convention by adding Citra hops to California Sonoma Coast Sauvignon Blanc (SB) grapes at the end of the fermentation process, rolling out the groundbreaking dry-hopped SB this past February.

via Smart Sips: The Infinite Monkey Theorem’s Dry-Hopped SB – 5280

Cook Like A Pro: Oyster Shucking Classes at Blue Island Oyster Bar and Seafood

If you agree that there’s something intensely gratifying about removing a lobster’s shell, cracking crab legs, and snapping open a fresh clam to get to the succulent meat within, then Cherry Creek’s Blue Island Oyster Bar and Seafood has the class for you: Chef & Shucker, its new oyster- and clam-shucking series. Cory Egan, Blue Island’s oyster buyer and pro shucker, debuted the experience in March and now teaches the class at least twice a month.

via Cook Like A Pro: Oyster Shucking Classes at Blue Island Oyster Bar and Seafood – 5280

Five New Spots to Check Out for Denver Restaurant Week

Denver Restaurant Week is back! From February 24 to March 5, the 13th annual celebration of the local restaurant scene is offering deals at 256 (and counting) restaurant choices. This year, DRW organizer Visit Denver introduced a price-tiering option, with three-course meals at participating restaurants falling into three price ranges (per person): $25, $35, and $45. Not only does this give restaurant-goers more options for dinner, it also offers restaurateurs a bit more flexibility in creating their menus. Whether you’re looking for a casual bargain or a black-tie splurge, this year’s DRW lineup offers something for every taste and budget.

via Five New Spots to Check Out for Denver Restaurant Week – 5280