Posts from the ‘news’ category

Dior: From Paris to the World

dior

The highly anticipated fashion exhibit, Dior: From Paris to the World, will be open to the public on Monday, November 19 until March 3 at the Denver Art Museum.

After two years of meticulous curation, an A-team led by Dior expert Florence Müller, the museum’s Avenir Foundation curator of textile art and fashion, and renowned architect Shohei Shigematsu, an OMA New York director and partner, visually tells the story of the iconic French designer Christian Dior (1905-1957) and the playful path the House of Dior follows.

In 1947, Dior shocked the fashion world in more ways than one. After the devastation of World War II, Dior’s bright and colorful vision put Paris back into the international spotlight as fashion capital of the world. It was as if the end of the war allowed Dior to finally breathe and express himself freely. The result: a “New Look” of dresses that celebrated the female body (cinched waistlines, fuller pleated skirts, embellishments) and becoming a fashion pioneer by being the first to accessorize his creations with his own purses, gloves, and heels. “The world was his playground,” Müller says, as Dior was invited to India, Japan, and the Americas to design dresses for the wealthy and royal. Though Dior reigned for a short 10 years, his vision has inspired six more artistic designers to pay homage to the house he built.

The exhibit is chronologically set for the most part. At the beginning, as you pause to admire Dior’s rendition of the New Look over the past seventy years, you’ll notice the up-cycled mill aluminum backdrop, which Shigematsu says was to mimic the titanium juts of the art museum itself, but also feels like a nod to Denver’s own growing industrial feel. After checking out designs by Dior and his successor, a then-novice Yves-Saint Laurent, you’ll be stunned by “The Office of Dreams,” a wall full of suspended dress sketches made of white cotton muslin. Then take a tour of women who’ve sported Dior throughout the years (Marilyn Monroe, Rihanna, Charlize Theron, to name a few) and get a glimpse into Dior’s evolving line inspired by surrounding eras, culture, and art. There’s much to see at the Dior exhibit (18th century French-inspired dresses sure to impress Marie Antoinette herself, as well as a neatly stacked rainbow wall, chock full of bold statement accessories), so visit DenverArtMuseum.org to get in on this exclusive display of fashion history today.

Written for Hand in Hand, a publication. See original article here.

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A Fresh Take on “This is America”

one thing I cannot believe people have NOT talked about yet is the impact of music videos on our youth, especially young black children. we’ve been warned in the past about how too much MTV is bad for you, but what exactly are music videos doing to children? in Childish Gambino’s “This is America” music video, we watch a stream of recurring problems for African Americans (which we are sadly desensitized to at this point), but I feel like the biggest one has flown right above everybody’s head.

there’s a reason he chose black school children in uniforms as his dancers. if they were in any other dress, we would forget that these kids are only in school. imagine being a young black child after school, scrolling through the channels. all he or she sees is a sea of white: white actors, white problems, white music. then they stop at BET or MTV or ESPN and sees someone who looks like them. they see talent, fame, and a ticket to respect. (something children clearly do not have enough of, but more on that later.)

they see these moves. they imitate them, in hopes to be as good as what they see on their TV screen. then there’s the words, the enticing rhythm and flow. violence is a common theme they rap along to. so is sex, alcohol, and drugs. when they repeat this cycle enough, it becomes the norm. then they bring it to school. they start living it out on the weekends. and when life gets to be too much, there’s the unlucky ones who take it to the streets and probably end up belonging to the streets till they hit the grave. the streets are where those music video dreams can come alive.

in “This is America,” among all the chaos and crime, the children dance as a way of expression, but ultimately represent the influence black musicians can have. Donald Glover shows how he can smile and dance and rap without taking a second look at the chaos behind him, and the teens blindly follow in suit. he’s blatantly calling out the rappers who are not using their privilege to speak the truth and break the cycle. the same can also be said for the media, which has a track record of depicting African Americans as criminals.

going forward, we should empower youth, especially black youth, to show them a way out of this false narrative. I feel like there’s a lot of unnecessary hate in this country and to fix it, we need to take a step back, think about that feeling, and learn as much about it as we can to offer a solution. rap artists should take note that they have a very difficult/important role to play, too, but rap & hip hop may very well be the bridge that brings us all together.

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Camp Unplugged

Photo courtesy of Shambhala Sun Camp

Dhyana Kida was 12 years old when she first attended the Shambhala Sun Camp nestled in the picturesque mountains of Red Feather Lakes, Colorado. Her parents had gone when they were her age, her brother has also attended, and then it was finally her turn.

“I fell in love and went almost every year,” Kida, now 21, says. Her story is similar to most who go: they find themselves returning to camp year after year, eventually becoming staff members that guide the next batch of camp-goers.

The Shambhala Sun Camp is held in only three places in the world: Limousin, France; Nova Scotia, Canada; and our very own northern Colorado. Shambhala Buddhism, which is inspired by the principle that every human being has a fundamental nature of basic goodness, is a philosophy that influences the camp. It stems from Tibetan Buddhism, an ancient practice that spread rapidly in the 1950s after the Chinese takeover of Tibet caused the Tibetan Buddhist teachers to leave the country. Inspired by the Dalai Lama and his practices, campers of all faiths learn about its mindfulness, meditation and awareness practices and can cultivate his or her own being — without any technology present.

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Get Schooled on Champagne at Nocturne Jazz & Supper Club

Photo courtesy of Lori J Photography
If you haven’t been to RiNo’s Nocturne Jazz & Supper Club5280’s 2017 Top of the Town pick for Eatertainment—here’s an excellent reason for you to check it out: Champagne School. Nocturne co-owner and sommelier Scott Mattson and Breakthru Beverage sommeliers Sam Heider and Adam Vance debuted the class series in July, covering topics such as rosé and grower’s Champagne. Sadly, all of the summer classes are sold out—but there’s still time to make it to the last installment. The final(e) class, which will focus on Champagne winemaking traditions and the art of food pairings, takes place on October 29. This don’t-miss event features a four-course meal by chef Greg Weadick, ample bubbly tastings and pairings, and a set of tunes from vintage-jazz musicians Annie Booth and Matt Smiley.

Nocturne began holding cocktail classes earlier this year, but the new Champagne classes give Denverites the opportunity to dive deep into the terroir and culture of the famed French wine. As founder and co-owner Nicole Mattson says, “It’s a fun opportunity to educate the people of Denver on why it’s a lifestyle splurge.”

At a recent Champagne introduction course, I was welcomed to the chic, industrial venue with a flute of prosecco. While I was initially befuddled—why on earth would wine experts serve prosecco at a Champagne class?—the Italian sparkling wine served was a teaching moment. Prosecco’s quick process from harvest to glass can’t touch the complex flavors produced by the time-consuming methode traditionelle of true French Champagne. Soon, we were sipping samples of crisp, apple-y Nicolas Feuillatte and yeasty, effervescent Charles Heidsieck, nibbling on black lentil falafel, charred corn and smoked hominy fritters, and black cod croquettes, and jotting down tasting notes as our knowledgeable instructors shared their expertise. At the end of the class, we voted for our favorite sips; the winning bottle of bubbles from each class in the series will be featured at the October 29 dinner.

Written for 5280.com. Find the original blog post here.

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Get Your Summer Passport Now!

Everybody loves a good bargain. And the Passport Program—which offers two-for-one boozy drink deals at 68 different venues across town—may be our very favorite way to pinch pennies. Two Parts initially launched the Passport Program in Denver in 2013, and it’s since expanded to eight more U.S. cities, as well as developing a winter program (the Winter Warmer) and a coffee-centric version (the Fika Passport).

via Get Your Summer Passport Now! – 5280

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Smart Sips: The Infinite Monkey Theorem’s Dry-Hopped SB

Once upon a time, oenophiles might have have turned up their noses at the prospect of canned wine. Indeed, when RiNo-based urban winery the Infinite Monkey Theoremreleased its first line of canned vino in 2011, it had to convince consumers that its red, white, rose, and moscato were all just as good as their glass-bottled counterparts. Fast forward to 2017, and TIMT is still innovating: Winemaker and founder Ben Parsons defied convention by adding Citra hops to California Sonoma Coast Sauvignon Blanc (SB) grapes at the end of the fermentation process, rolling out the groundbreaking dry-hopped SB this past February.

via Smart Sips: The Infinite Monkey Theorem’s Dry-Hopped SB – 5280

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Cook Like A Pro: Oyster Shucking Classes at Blue Island Oyster Bar and Seafood

If you agree that there’s something intensely gratifying about removing a lobster’s shell, cracking crab legs, and snapping open a fresh clam to get to the succulent meat within, then Cherry Creek’s Blue Island Oyster Bar and Seafood has the class for you: Chef & Shucker, its new oyster- and clam-shucking series. Cory Egan, Blue Island’s oyster buyer and pro shucker, debuted the experience in March and now teaches the class at least twice a month.

via Cook Like A Pro: Oyster Shucking Classes at Blue Island Oyster Bar and Seafood – 5280

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Five New Spots to Check Out for Denver Restaurant Week

Denver Restaurant Week is back! From February 24 to March 5, the 13th annual celebration of the local restaurant scene is offering deals at 256 (and counting) restaurant choices. This year, DRW organizer Visit Denver introduced a price-tiering option, with three-course meals at participating restaurants falling into three price ranges (per person): $25, $35, and $45. Not only does this give restaurant-goers more options for dinner, it also offers restaurateurs a bit more flexibility in creating their menus. Whether you’re looking for a casual bargain or a black-tie splurge, this year’s DRW lineup offers something for every taste and budget.

via Five New Spots to Check Out for Denver Restaurant Week – 5280

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Whiskey Lovers, Rejoice: Hearth & Dram Is Open

At one-week-old Hearth & Dram, it wasn’t the intoxicating smell of roasted suckling pig, the game-y bite of fresh bison tartar, or the deep savoriness of roasted hen of the woods mushrooms that secured my devotion. No, it was the impressive library of whisk(e)y, bourbon, and rye—more than 350 varieties in total—that won me over.

via Whiskey Lovers, Rejoice: Hearth & Dram Is Open – 5280

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All about roundabouts in Columbia

Interstate 70 exits are getting makeovers in Columbia. A new roundabout is in place on Rangeline’s exit, and the West Boulevard exit will have two multi-lane roundabouts by the end of July. Nearby, the roundabout by Creasy Springs and Business Loop 70 was the first in the state built by the Missouri Department of Transportation in 1996, says Trent Brooks, MODOT district traffic engineer.

via All about roundabouts in Columbia | News & Features | Vox Magazine

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