Postcard Foods

Rocky Mountain Stop: Postcard Foods in Dumont

Enjoy Postcard Foods’ New American fare for now and later.

There’s a new reason to pull off on Exit 234 on your way to the slopes this weekend. As of January, Postcard Foods is open for business in Dumont and here to cure your mountainside munchies.

Postcard Foods isn’t a restaurant or a food truck, but a food trailer that owners Jim Abraham and Bridget Bagel use to serve hot and frozen meals prepared from a commissary kitchen in Genesee Park. Based in Denver, the two originally hail from New Jersey, where they were surrounded by diverse Peruvian, Turkish, and Italian neighborhoods and cuisine.

Bridget and Jim didn’t meet in New Jersey though. They met in Black Rock Desert, Nevada (home of Burning Man) more than two years ago while making ice cream with liquid nitrogen. They were long distance for awhile so when Bridget visited Denver, she would make freezer-friendly meals for Jim so they could eat them during FaceTime dates together.

Last year, after Bridget graduated from Boston University with a degree in gastronomy, Jim left his longtime job of selling medical parts in Denver, and the couple traveled the world and began researching new flavors for Postcard Foods. They explored countries such as Morocco and Vietnam and then traveled to 18 more states throughout the US.

The two recognized a need for convenient high country fare after noticing long wait times at restaurant ski towns and Airbnbs not having user-friendly kitchens. In addition to Postcard’s ready-to-eat menu (with options such as the zesty Philadelphia Roast Pork sandwich and the super melty Verona Chicken Pesto Panini), the takeaway frozen meals have been its best-selling order so far.

The menu will change seasonally but will always have a gluten-free, vegan, and kid-friendly option. Right now you can grab a Marrakesh Chicken Tagine (made with chicken thighs, chickpeas, olives, quinoa, and seasoned with Moroccan spices and lemon zest) or a super-filling Shepard’s Pie (Bridget’s favorite as “mashed potatoes are the ultimate comfort food”), which can be popped in the oven and enjoyed by the entire family. Best of all, they’re aware that meal kit packaging can be pretty wasteful so all their meals are packaged in a plant compostable fiber that’s microwave- and oven-safe. 

This summer, Postcard plans to be open five days a week instead of three to better serve the hungry summer crowds. In addition to the convenient gas station right next door, there is also a Pure Harvest dispensary and possible liquor store in the works, making Postcard Foods your ideal mountain pitstop. As for future plans, Bridget says, “It would be a dream to have a brick-and-mortar as a commissary kitchen to give to ski towns. We could have different trucks [to distribute meals in] in Breckenridge and other towns.”

Grab a bite to eat for now (and later) from Postcard Foods before your next mountain adventure today.

Address: 1041 County Road 308, Dumont-Downieville-Lawson 
Phone Number: 303-900-3201
Hours: Friday-Sunday 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
postcardfoods.com

Colorado’s Freshest Milk

Have one glass of Longmont Dairy Farm’s ultra creamy and delicious milk, and you’ll know why 25,000 customers on the Front Range remain loyal to this longtime institution. 

The Family Business

Longmont Dairy Farm (LDF) is more than half a century old and three generations in. Founded by Reese Boatman, Karl Obluda and Jim Boyd, LDF has been delivering fresh Colorado milk to their customers’ doorsteps since 1965. In 1988, Boyd’s son and daughter-in-law, David and Susan, took over the business. Then in 2015, their children, Dan Boyd and Katie Herrmann, became the new owners. 

Boyd is in charge of the mechanical side, including the processing plant, trucks and milk routes, while Herrmann oversees customer service, sales, marketing, IT and human resources. Since they took over, the two continue their grandfather’s legacy of running a sustainable and local dairy farm.

“We have big shoes to fill,” Herrmann says. “We want to keep our legacy alive. There’s a pressure to keep business going since my grandfather passed it on to my parents and now me and my brother. We have a sense of pride to keep this in the family. The Longmont Dairy Farm family has [served Coloradan] families as stewards of God, and we want to carry that forward.”

From Farm to Table

Herrmann says it takes a little over 48 hours for milk to travel from the Loveland dairy farm to a customer’s front door. The milk comes from Colorado born-and-raised Holstein cows, fed on a local diet of grain, hay and corn silage. Milk is stored in a tank until a truck transports it to the processing plant on Coffman Street. 

At the processing plant, the milk is homogenized, pasteurized and bottled in recycled glass bottles. Crates of chilled milk bottles wait until nightfall when an armada of 35 delivery trucks head out at 11 p.m. and make deliveries into the wee morning hours, Sunday through Thursday. Herrmann says the company delivers about 4,000 gallons of milk daily between Loveland and Highlands Ranch. 

A Convenient Coincidence

Ninety-nine percent of LDF’s business is from single-home deliveries but apartment-dwellers, fear not — milk is available for purchase at Your Butcher Frank and Longmont’s Whole Foods.

In the past, LDF has offered orange juice, eggs and butter. Since its 2018 plant expansion, LDF now delivers loaves of bread from Castle Rock’s Bread in the Box, cold brew coffee and fresh iced tea sourced by Boulder’s Silver Canyon Coffee and, more recently, Denver’s Prefare chicken and pizza meal kits.

Modern technology has made it more convenient for grocery delivery services. It’s expected the U.S. online grocery market will experience multi-billion dollar growth over the next few years. Regardless of market trends, LDF has proven its value to Front Range families for generations.

Sign up at longmontdairyfarm.com

Courtesy Longmont Dairy Farms

When you sign up for milk delivery service, Longmont Dairy Farm gives you a complimentary cooler. But, if you want to take the nostalgia up a notch, LDF also offers stainless steel and wooden milk boxes. Customers can then enjoy their breakfast with a glass of milk, free of antibiotics and rBST growth hormones. 

Once you’re finished with your bottle, don’t toss it in the recycle bin. Instead, leave it in the cooler (or milk box) so the delivery driver can take it back to the plant to be washed, sanitized and used again.

Community Service 

Since LDF launched the Milk Caps for Mooola program in 2012, it has collected 7 million milk caps and donated $350,000 to 350 participating elementary schools along the Front Range. Herrmann says with that money, students are able to access new technology, music programs and field trips.

https://www.boulderweekly.com/special-editions/colorados-freshest-milk/

The Longmont Nature Guide

The Spirit of Longmont” Rafe Ropek, 2009
Photo courtesy of the City of Longmont

In the city of Longmont, residents have plenty of places to get outside and enjoy nature, including 41 parks containing a total of 2,242 acres.

“Longmont puts a lot of pride into the park system,” says Kathy Kron, Longmont Parks and Natural Resources senior project manager. “When it comes to having a variety of parks, we have neighborhood, nature and greenway parks.

“It’s a neat aspect because you can get lost in nature without having to leave town.”

And as long as you’re lost in nature, here are a few of the things you can do before you find your way back home:

Bird watching: It’s common to see osprey, bald eagles and a wide variety of hawks and other raptors. Many species of smaller birds such as chickadees, finches, blue jays, doves and woodpeckers are also common. Near evening or early morning be on the lookout for wild turkeys. And while harder to find, rare species such as the burrowing owl, which can be found near prairie dog colonies, do appear from time to time. When water is present, expect to see cormorants, American white pelicans, great blue herons, a wide variety of ducks and Canada geese.

Wildlife encounters: While most animals in Longmont are of the small and furry variety — rabbits, prairie dogs, weasels and the like — larger animals such as beaver, coyotes and deer are sometimes encountered. And if you venture west to Longmont’s Button Rock Preserve (west of Lyons), you’ll get the chance to see mountain lion and bear. 

Art viewing: Some of Longmont’s parks have wonderful nature-inspired art. So why not take in a little culture on your next hike with art including these pieces:

“The Spirit of Longmont” This installation — created by Rafe Ropek in 2009 — can be spotted on southwest Diagonal Highway. The 48 leaves alternate from yellow to green to represent Longmont’s agricultural roots, while the sphere in the middle calls to the future. 

“Dawson Silverwood” Steve Jensen, 2003
Photo courtesy of the City of Longmont

“Dawson Silverwood” Located at Lake McIntosh, Steve Jensen’s aluminum sculpture, created in 2003, contains inscriptions by students about their hopes for the future.

“A Lady and a damsel” Built in 2019 by Amanda Willshire, this towering structure is made from recycled bike parts, an old Volkswagen hood, and golf clubs; 210 Ken Pratt Blvd., on the St. Vrain River Trail.

There’s plenty more where those came from, including all along the St. Vrain Greenway. But we know half the fun is when you discover such art on your own, so we’ll keep the list short.

So, now that you know what to do, let’s take a look at some of the great places to do them right in your back yard.

Continue reading “The Longmont Nature Guide”

A Weekend in Florence

Five years ago…

I raised my hand to block the May sun’s glaring rays. Across the street from the train station, I saw a church, decorated in contrasting black stripes and rectangles, a remnant of the past that survived the Italian Renaissance.

Was I dreaming? Did I really make it?

There was a million mistakes I made on that trip that I swore not to repeat. This time, I would have lighter luggage. Working Internet. Close-toed shoes. Enough Italian words to get me by. Enough euros to get me by.

After I left Italy, despite how frustrating it had been at some times (or like, the entire time), I began to think about it daily. I was obsessed with the old country. I daydreamed about strolling down cobblestones through narrow alleyways. The church bell ringing at the strike of noon. The chocolate, metallic aroma of espresso, and the clink of a spoon as I stirred in my sugar. I missed it. I wanted it. And I promised myself I’d be back again.

Coming out of Switzerland, the snow began to dissipate as we entered northern Italy. Wintery Swiss wonderland transitioned into a fairytale mountain paradise. There were waterfalls, there were palm trees, there were mountains that reached high above the clouds. We switched trains in Milan, and then to Florence, my home away from home, we went.

Italy is a country that’s stuck in time.

The Roman Empire and its gods forever captured in stone.

Roman Catholic power still towering over everything and everyone.

Hundreds-of-years-old castles and estates in the Tuscan distance.

Farmers making the same movements (but with improvements) that their ancestors did, producing meat and cheese and wine from the land and undergoing whatever means necessary that ensure that it’s perfect every. single. time.

Who needs a time machine when you can have Italy?

There’s a million reasons why this country’s special to me, but I think the two main reasons are it’s 1. where I found my appetite and 2. realized there was power in my words. I used to think I wasn’t a good writer even though I had written stories since I was seven. I remember the first time I read my words out loud to my teacher and my classmates, feeling the weight lift off my shoulders as I spoke my truth. I remember biting into a piece of prosciutto and melon, the sweet and saltiness mingling in my mouth, and thinking, “Damn. This is actually really good” and not feel the self-loathing as I ate another then another. I ate and drank and wrote freely during my time there despite my demons. It was only right to return to the place I found my yellow brick road. Italy was the first place that I was finally in control.

The Boboli Gardens

The Uffizi Gallery

And last, but not least:

Il Cibo

The Swiss Alps

here is Winter
she is a storm
from chaos & ice
Spring is reborn

As our train sped out of Strasbourg, I could feel the chill in my bones and smell snow in the air. It was strangely nostalgic as I felt the same way when I drove west of Denver, into the mountains, except this time I was heading east, out of France, and into Switzerland.

I glanced at my shoes and my little red carry-on in dismay. The snow was falling quite thickly now, reminding me of winter countrysides in the Midwest as blankets of snow enveloped the small towns we passed by. I don’t remember ascending into the Alps as by then, our train was engulfed by the storm. I sadly thought about my snow boots. My boots, along with the rest of my winter gear, were stuffed in a closet thousands of miles away in Colorado.

Nothing feels worse than being unprepared. But like the same rule out in the Rocky Mountains, you’re supposed to prepare for all seasons. The same goes for Switzerland.

We arrived in Wilderswil, Switzerland, during an April snow storm.

We chose to stay in Interlaken as there was a train station (do you see a trend yet?) and it was on the way to Italy. It’s nestled between the gorgeous lakes, Thunersee and Brienzersee, and surrounded by mountains. We found an Airbnb in Wilderswil, just a ten minute train south of Interlaken. However, the train was down due to snow so they had complimentary buses that dropped us off at the Wilderswil train stop. From there, we walked to our Airbnb, Hotel Bären, which had a sauna, restaurant ($$$), and very nice concierge to help us during our stay.

Waking up in Wilderswil

We took the the regional Swiss train (which was not covered by our Eurail train pass) to visit Lauterbrunnen and Grindelwald, the sun now shining brightly on the fresh snow. Frosty creeks rushed alongside the train tracks; the snow had begun to melt from the spring trees. It had also snowed so much, said our barista in Grindelwald, that they had reopened the ski lifts for just that day, too.

Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland

Lord of the Rings author J.R.R. Tolkien based the elven city Rivendell from his stay in Lauterbrunnen.

Grindelwald, Switzerland

P.S. As far as where to eat in Switzerland, I recommend heading to the grocery store and packing up a lunch and snacks if you want to save money. Most restaurants I found were part of bed and breakfasts, which had limited hours and were guest-only. Interlaken had more options, but it was not convenient to us as we were out in the mountains so plan accordingly.

Photography by Tristan Lonberger

Next on the blog: A Weekend in Florence