la la land and a van

I fell asleep to the steady whoosh of cars that would rock our van every time one would pass. The traffic lulled me to sleep and before I knew it, the sun was rising and the fog was lifting from the bay. The van was perspirating and had it not been for the limo-tinted windows, our illegal presence would be given away. But it didn’t matter. All the cars that surrounded us on this strip of parking space had sleeping inhabitants, and it also struck me that quite possibly half of L.A. was homeless. No, not homeless* like the man who dug into the trash can a few feet away from us and ate the remainder of my In-N-Out Double Double. Homeless as in didn’t care for a home and would rather wake up to the waves crashing on Santa Monica’s beach.

Continue reading →

Tiny Town Tastes: Lula’s Tavern in Moberly

Lula’s Tavern was recommended to me from the very beginning by my friend’s husband who is a Moberly native. Moberly is not a tiny town compared to Missouri standards, population roughly around 13,700, but Lula’s fit the requirement nevertheless. Upon research of this place, the words “warm beer and lousy service” kept appearing in contrast to it’s high ratings and outstanding comments. What was going on?

via Tiny Town Tastes: Lula’s Tavern in Moberly | Food & Drink | Vox Magazine

Tiny Town Tastes: Iron Horse Hotel & Restaurant in Blackwater

You’re in for a history lesson. My tiny-town travels have taken me to the quaint historic town of Blackwater, which is so small that if you blink, you might miss it. Located 40 minutes west of Columbia, past Boonville and a couple exits, Blackwater was once a refueling station for the Missouri Pacific Railroad between Jefferson City and Kansas City.

via Tiny Town Tastes: Iron Horse Hotel & Restaurant in Blackwater | Restaurants | Vox Magazine

Tiny Town Tastes: the Claysville Store in Hartsburg

After a slew of suggestions, I had a handful that pointed me in the direction of Claysville Store, 5650 E. Claysville Road in Hartsburg, located north of Jefferson City by the river and Katy Trail. I headed south on U.S. 63 and took a right at Claysville road down yet another winding path to find out what the rave was all about.

via Tiny Town Tastes: the Claysville Store in Hartsburg | Food & Drink | Vox Magazine

Tiny Town Tastes: Chim’s Thai Kitchen in Cooper’s Landing

Chim’s Thai Kitchen is my go-to place for pad thai in Columbia. Once upon a time, they had three locations — downtown, off Nifong Boulevard and down by the river at Cooper’s Landing. Last fall, I called to to put in my weekly order and the phone rang and rang. No one picked up. I drove to the restaurant, and it was vacant. What was I supposed to do? Where was I supposed to get my pad thai? The other Thai joints had to suffice. I didn’t know where Chim’s went.

via Tiny Town Tastes: Chim’s Thai Kitchen in Cooper’s Landing | Food & Drink | Vox Magazine

Wanderlust: Remembering Sept. 11

I weave through the streets, turn a corner and there it is: One World Trade Center, the tallest building in this hemisphere.

At first, it takes me a moment to realize what I am looking at. The sun gleams off the glass tower and blinds all who look upon it. Below, a vast black memorial fountain embeds the ground, each spurt of water reminding us of each life lost.

Do you remember Sept. 11?

I was 8 years old. My teacher lined the class against the white wall outside the library. We had just finished our computer science class; I learned about Google. Something terrible had happened, she said.

I saw a TV screen in the corner of my living room as I curled up on a green leather couch. Planes crashed into two towers, again and again. Wafts of smoke filled every channel. I was torn between shock, sadness and disbelief.

I step off the street corner and out of my reverie. It might have been 15 years ago, but it’s all still real to me.

Source: Wanderlust: Remembering Sept. 11

From garden to table

Plated

By Claire Lardizabal
image1 (3)

CHIUSDINO, Italy – Mint perfumes the air as you walk through one of Tenuta di Spannocchia’s three gardens. The hard-boiled eggs at breakfast came from the hens, the salad lettuce for lunch was just picked this morning and the rosé wine served at dinner was vinted and bottled here just last year.

As you pass the four lemon trees and step into the garden below, the endless slope of vegetables and herbs can become overwhelming. What don’t they have? I thought to myself as we gingerly tried not to crush rows of potatoes, carrots and basil.

Carmen Zandarin is the mastermind behind all this and has been for the past 12 years. She runs and maintains the gardens with the help of eight farm interns a year. On Mondays, she walks through the gardens then discusses the following week’s meals with the kitchen staff, depending on what’s…

View original post 227 more words